National Archival Appraisal Board 

Conseil National d'Évaluation des Archives

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Upcoming events / Évènements à venir

    • June 23, 2021
    • 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM (EDT)
    • Zoom Webinar

    To register: 
    https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_PWTvuteQTqin5dg0mufkwQ


    In 1970, at the annual meeting of the Archives Section of the Canadian Historical Association, the forerunner of the ACA, there was a formative discussion of the monetary appraisal of donations of archival documents.  Robert S. Gordon, head of the Manuscripts Division of the then Public Archives of Canada had initiated discussions with Revenue Canada exploring how archives might follow other charitable institutions in providing donors with receipts for the fair market value of such 'gifts in kind'.  The initial response from Revenue Canada was skeptical, referring to 'accumulated junk'. Through the leadership and perseverance of Bob Gordon, the archival community appointed the first 'document appraisal committee' and established the key elements of the approach.  The challenge was complex: having to establish credibility both with Revenue Canada and archives while developing a methodology and body of practice for the monetary appraisal of unique archival fonds. 

    Ian Wilson was a member of that first Document Appraisal Committee and later served as President of NAAB.  He has the perspective both of an appraiser and of the head of archives active in the acquisition of private fonds.  He also admits to being well into his 'anecdotage'.  Ian will reflect on the early years of monetary appraisal and highlight some of his memorable moments and issues in appraising, including the monetary appraisal of the textual component of the donation of the Hudson's Bay Co archives to the government of Manitoba. 


    • July 08, 2021
    • 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM (EDT)
    • Zoom Webinar

    To register: 
    https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_XZZZExMLQBiVyuBugdV7eg

    When Revenue Canada introduced income tax credits for donations of cultural material to institutions, one intent was to encourage people to see documents as being valuable, and to donate documents to institutions rather than to garbage dumps or incinerators. Three examples suggest how that worked: Eatons; Roy Studio photographs; Boyd family diaries and household records. From the late 1960s, respect for archival institutions grew. Sometimes the tax credit was reinvested in archives.


    • July 15, 2021
    • 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM (EDT)
    • Zoom Webinar

    To register: 
    https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_vv1r_QsJRbG0Std0lPIiOQ

    Despite the mystique tied to auctions, prices realized are only the values that prevailed in the circumstances of the actual auction; prices received are not predictors of future value. Sometimes the house uses methods to inflate values: consider the Duckworth auction. Sometimes the conflation of different types of collectors affects value: consider the sailor on the Nautilus. Reflections of Nathan Raab on auction experiences in his Hunt for History.

    • August 12, 2021
    • 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM (EDT)
    • Zoom Webinar

    To register: 
    https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_rJkzXjESQmqpjXVKktokyg

    As an appraiser for NAAB since 1983, Steve has conducted several hundred appraisals, many of them for applications to CCPERB. As an independent appraiser, he has conducted several thousands of appraisals ranging from complete institutional holdings to individual items such as single books, works of art, artifacts, or significant manuscripts. In this session, Steve will analyze his processes of defining, researching, and presenting a monetary evaluation, using examples from his experiences as a dealer and appraiser.



    • August 19, 2021
    • 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM (EDT)
    • Zoom Webinar

    To register: 
    https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_kPetian0TsKzYyyUEOr4LA

    The roots of both NAAB and CCPERB come out of changes to the Income Tax Act. NAAB was at the birth of CCPERB and over the years the relationship led to frequent assessments of the best ways to conduct appraisals in a Revenue Canada environment. Both had developed the same understanding of fair market value, and by mutual respect and reflection added changes to the way reports were prepared. Good examples of the partnership were ideas on considerations, reasoned justification and the triangulation method. 

    The recent revisions to the CCPERB Guide For Monetary Appraisals (Nov 2020) raises issues around the definition of fair market value and challenges archivists and CCPERB to recognize that institutional competition for the donation of significant fonds constitutes a marketplace different from that for art and collectibles. 

     

    • August 25, 2021
    • 12:00 PM - 1:15 PM (EDT)
    • Zoom Webinar

    To register: 
    https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_RW9n_3nBSKi8NqO9wNJiVQ

    This session will discuss current developments and explore various options as we move forward in the realm of monetary appraisal. What does the community want? What kind of strategies should NAAB be considering for the future? What can we do better and how? What can NAAB do to inform and influence CCPERB? Is the CCPERB process still useful for archival acquisitions? Is there a future for NAAB?

     Six different appraisers will offer their perspectives on these questions.

     


NAAB Secretariat:
130 Albert, Suite 1912
Ottawa, ON
K1P 5G4
Tel.: (613) 565-1222 ext. 191
Toll free: 1-866-254-1403
Fax: 1-855-855-0774

Secrétariat du CNÉA :
130, rue Albert, Bureau 1912
Ottawa, ON
K1P 5G4
Tél. : (613) 565-1222 ext. 191
Sans frais : 1-866-254-1403
Téléc. : 1-855-855-0774

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